When the sun goes down

Taste me, drink my soul.
Show me all the things
that I shouldn't know.

Apr 16
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture DrawingAs a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

Norm

(via laryndawn)


shastaaglassess:

I used to do this in elementary school :)

shastaaglassess:

I used to do this in elementary school :)

(via voodoochildbaby)


Apr 15
pheberoni:

yeha

pheberoni:

yeha

(via jhenne-bean)


Apr 14

ROBOTS AND CYBORGS ARE NOT THE SAME THING

kkaito:

robots - 100% mechanical, no organic or living parts

androids - robots that are designed to look human-like (100% mechanical)

cyborgs - organic/living thing with added mechanical or cybernetic parts

(via lellyphant)


dashawnmahone:

veesdumpingrounds:

tiny tutorial thing I meant to make for the people I sometimes help out on portefolios : ) just wanted to share perspective doesnt have to be a bugger, yknow ? 

For my art bros

(via jhenne-bean)


Apr 10
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

(via laryndawn)


mastercreart:

leg refences

mastercreart:

leg refences

(via talkativelock)


aysahrhia:

derpygrooves:

W-
WHAT

Yup, super handy trick to know!

aysahrhia:

derpygrooves:

W-

WHAT

Yup, super handy trick to know!

(via frostlawyer)


Mar 28
“Women are told it is unfeminine and gross to have muscles and to cultivate strength, which in turn leads them to actively avoid doing things that will build muscles and strength, which then makes them even less capable of doing things that require strength, which the critics then use as proof of women’s inherent physical frailty. And so the cycle continues…”

Women’s difficulty with pull-ups is about more than biology | Fit and Feminist (via rememo)

And I always want to point out here: women, on average, possess more lower-body strength, while men, on average, possess more upper-body strength. There’s a lot of overlap and it isn’t always individually applicable, but that’s the generalization, averaging across the population.

But we SOCIALLY value upper-body strength, and upper-body muscles. So we construct women as weaker, because we refuse to measure them on the body parts where they may be stronger, we devalue those.

Lifting is mostly done with the legs. So women may be as good or better at heavy lifting as men. But we socially construct lifting as having to do with large, muscular arms and chests. You don’t really need powerful arms and chests to lift—you need powerful thighs, otherwise you’re gonna throw your back out. We actually lie about what makes a person strong and capable to favor men.

Push-up and pull-ups are upper-body strength exercises. So they’re socially valued. The military doesn’t tell you to do 20 squats as penance. No one is fucking impressed by all the squats you can do. Squats just sound stupid, hah, squats. We laugh at them because women might be better at them than men, on average. They’re worthless.

(via iknewiwouldregretthis)

This stuff plays into all sorts of other body image problems, too. The body weight that’s regarded as ideal for women, for example, is really only achievable for individuals suffering from mild to moderate muscular atrophy. You literally can’t get there just by shedding fat - you also have to let your muscles waste away. We actually regard it as “normal” for a woman to be suffering from muscular atrophy.

(via dancing-painted-bears)

In addition to having more natural lower body strength, women have a higher natural tolerance for pain and discomfort, and actually have more natural endurance because of this. As a matter of fact, women are optimally built for many types of strenuous physical activity, especially activities that require endurance like hiking or long-distance running. (Think about it—women have more natural fat reserves, lower centers of gravity, strong, short legs, and are also usually used to managing pain because of periods and other female-specific occurrences.)

(via madithefreckled)


Mar 25

thedustyleaves:

About color: Everything you’ve been taught so far is (most likely) a lie.

Generally, what we know about color, is extremely “basic” knowledge, in the sense that classical art teachers don’t really know what they’re teaching. They’re just going by the book, rather than studying the book. 
I’ve had the honor of being taught by Lawrence Marvit, a teacher who studied everything he wanted to understand to the point where he could tear up old theories with no answer and explain them as simple and correct as possible. 

I was asked a while ago if I could give my opinion on a video about how to understand and study color, and if what they said in the video was correct, and I had to say no. I copied my answer for future use, and here’s what  I said, just corrected and with more detail: 

The things he taught in the video are not actually the most important - it’s just what people are made to believe are important. They are still very much valid, but they make color so much more complicated than it actually is, especially when it comes to putting different colors together in a picture. 

Some of these complications come for example from painting. You are told that you can go to an art-store and buy only blue, red and yellow, and then you will be able to mix all the other colors. You will then get surprised to see that you can’t mix a proper blue toned green - you have all the colors, so you’re supposed to be able to get a blue toned green, right?
It’s because we don’t just need the RGB colors, we need a Blue and a red tone of each color, for example a blue toned yellow and a red toned yellow 
image

If you mix a warm blue and a warm yellow together, you’re going to get a muddy sort of green, while if you mix the cold yellow and the cold blue, you’re going to get the blue toned green. As soon as we were taught this in class, so many of us went “IF ONLY I HAD KNOWN THIS JFC DLJFLSKDS” because many of us had tried painting, but stopped the moment we thought we couldn’t mix the RGB colors well enough and that we were stupid, when in actuality - we needed two tones of each color, and no one had told us this. 

image

It’s the same with color harmonies; as much as harmonies are good and all, harmonies are only used if you want your eyes to “feel at rest”. But if you look around in your everyday life, there are basically no color harmonies and yet your eyes are fine and usually also at rest.
It’s because everything is lit under the same light and therefore it ultimately also has the same shadow.
In color class, we were taught about local color and lighting our local colors and giving them a shadow, so no matter how many rainbow and lego colors we splashed on our drawings, everything would still fit together, purely because it’s all lit by the same light and has the same colored shadow. Even with multiple light sources, it still works like this :) 

An example could be this;
image

This is a picture with numerous characters, all of them wearing different costumes with different colors. If it hadn’t been for the red light showering them all, it would have been rainbow barf, and it’s the same thing below! They’re all under the same light and they all have the same shadow so they fit together in the picture. 

image

Local color is the base color aka how does something look under white light when it’s not affected by its surroundings. 

For example; A plant is green, but under red light, it looks almost brown and the shadow is blueish.
Btw, a super easy way to find out what the color your shadow would be; invert the color of your light. Like, if you have violet light, invert it and the shadow is going to be green :) 

image

of course you have to make it clear that one thing is the shadow and the other is the light, so desaturating one and lighting up the other is going to help so it’s not the same value. Kind of like this but probably more extreme!  

image
Something that is also important to remember: color is always, ALWAYS in relation to other colors. Even if you put your finger up in front of you, there is still all the colors around your finger which slightly changes how the skin color is perceived. If you take a yellow color and put one square on a white piece of paper and another square on a black piece of paper. On the black piece the yellow color will look like a much more saturated compared to one on the white piece. 

image
You can  play with any colors you want as long as they’re lit! Of course if you’re doing a picture with flat colors and no shading, then you have to be careful with the colors you choose so they don’t blend together(unless it’s what you want). That’s mostly a matter of taste though, and color wheels can’t teach you what’s right or wrong, but they teach you what works by the book :)

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